Wildwood Catholic High School

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School History

School History

On August 7, 1947, Most Reverend Bartholomew Eustace, STD, Bishop of the Camden Diocese, announced the awarding of a contract for the erection of a new Catholic coeducational high school to be located at Fifteenth and Central Avenues, North Wildwood, New Jersey. It was the first Catholic high school in Cape May County, and it was built by the Right Reverend Monsignor Aloysius S. Quinlan, pastor of St. Ann’s parish. Ground was broken by Bishop Eustace on August 18; on July 11, 1948, he presided at the cornerstone laying at which Judge Clare Gerald Fenerty of Philadelphia was the principal speaker. The school opened in September 1948 with 80 students.

By 1957, Monsignor Augustine Crine of St. Ann’s parish secured permission from Most Reverend Justin McCarthy for an addition according to the expansion provisions in the original plans. Construction of the modern, well-equipped extension started in 1959, concluding in time to open in January 1960. Monsignor Augustine Mozier blessed the cornerstone on February 7, 1960.  Monsignor William Quinn obtained permission for a four-room addition, which was dedicated by Bishop James McHugh on February 11, 1999, as Wildwood Catholic was celebrating its 50th anniversary.

On January 5th, 2010 the Wildwood Catholic family received news that the school would be closing its doors for good at the end of the academic year.   The community responded extraordinarily.  After a few months of hard work and tremendous amounts of energy, news was received that the decision to close had been overturned.  Wildwood Catholic would remain open. 

Mission Statement

Wildwood Catholic High School has provided a value-centered, college preparatory education to the youth of Southern New Jersey, since 1948.  We nurture hearts and minds by the light of Christ, forming well rounded individuals who will shape their communities through leadership and service.  All are welcome to become part of our tradition